ARTIST STATEMENT

For 30 years I enjoyed a career as a professor of art history at a liberal arts university in the Midwest. My scholarship involved a variety of 20th Century topics. Over time, I began to shift more and more into the studio. The examination of objects made by others gradually became less meaningful for me than the physical act of fashioning objects of my own. My knowledge of the images and issues addressed by others informs much of what I do in my own work.

Today I make things I want to see, influenced by what I know has occupied artists through the modern era. Made of wood, each piece exhibits a degree if intricacy; works are built up of small pieces that are cut, fit and joined in an additive manner. This construction process is somewhat awkward and has the effect of minimizing distracting detail, forcing attention to the ingredients necessary to capture an image. The result is a simple, direct characterization of the image in question. On the one hand, the readable nature of the imagery is evident; the situations are entirely ordinary. Yet in the delivery of these ordinary moments, the imagery combines in implausible ways. The attire or attitudes of actors often undermine the circumstances; the nature of the physical space is typically problematic and the action of the narrative is regularly unapt (or at times inept).

The work that results from these ingredients is thus a balance of conflicting qualities; ordinary situations and recognizable content are given new form with idiosyncratic imagery in implausible compositions.


EDUCATION

PhD., Art History, University of Minnesota, 1980
M.A., Art History, University of Minnesota, 1979
M.A., Studio Art, University of Minnesota, Duluth, 1976
B.A., Studio Art, University of Minnesota, 1973